CARE OF BABIES, 1930 STYLE

I’ve been working with my old books, looking them up on the internet to find their value.  Slow process because I have to browse through them in the process of preparing them for sale, give away, or whatever I end up doing with them.

Have to share this bit from a book called Pictured Knowledge.  The first pages are gone, but the book looks like one on e-bay, 1930.

One chapter is titled “Care of Babies” and discusses a program for the Little Mothers’ League.  The picture depicts a Junior High School class—fourteen girls, three adults (one of whom is apparently a nurse).  The following is a list of materials suggested for preparing for one of these classes:

Gas stove and tubing

Bath tub

Double boiler

Two-quart dishpan, bowl, and tea kettle

One-quart pitcher

Enameled cup or saucepan, with cover, half-pint size

Tumbler

Eight-ounce graduate glass

Funnel

Scale

Basket

Strainer

Bath thermometer

Clinical thermometer

Four nipples

Knife, tablespoon, teaspoon, toothbrush

Two bath towels, two face towels

Package (one pound) absorbent cotton

Package of gauze, five yards

Rice or starch powder

One-half pound borax

One-quarter pound mustard

One package Robinson’s barley

Milk sugar

Lime water

Toothpicks

Small bag of salt

Bag of bran

Pad for scales

Tissue paper

Quilted padding, five yards, to make mattress & pillow

Large size washable doll

Complete set baby clothes, with patterns for making them

If this list was from 1930, I guess that would be an appropriate list for my mom when I was born!

About oneta hayes

ABOUT ME Hello. To various folks I am Neat’nee, Mom, Grandma Neta, Gramma, Aunt Neta, Aunt Noni, Aunt Neno, and Aunt Neto (lots of varieties from little nieces and nephews). To some I’m more like “Didn’t you used to be my teacher?” or “Don’t I know you from someplace?” To you, perhaps, I am a Fellow Blogger. Not “fellow” like a male or a guy, but “fellow” like a companion or an adventurer. I would choose to be Grandma Blogger, and have you pull up a chair, my website before you, while I tell you of some days of yore. I have experienced life much differently than most of you. It was and is a good life. I hope to share nuggets of appreciation for those who have gone before me and those who come after me. By necessity you are among those who come after me and I will tell you of those who came before. Once upon a time in a little house on a prairie - oops, change that lest I commit plagiarism - and change that “house on the prairie” to “dugout on the prairie.” So my story begins...
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6 Responses to CARE OF BABIES, 1930 STYLE

  1. dawnlizjones says:

    This is great stuff. I’m not sure what all of that was for. What a riot!

  2. oneta hayes says:

    i guess I should say, “I don’t remember.” haha I’m stumped about four nipples and no bottles!

  3. shoreacres says:

    I can’t get my mind around the mustard. What in the world was that for? I’m wondering if this was a British book, both because of the use of the word “League”, and because of the Robinson’s barley. I’ve read that barley water was used as a first food before barley mush, and the Robinson’s barley water sold today is an English brand. It’s so interesting to go back — not even a century! — and see what was common practice.

  4. oneta hayes says:

    The picture of the classroom was identified as a school in Missouri. I was surprised that it was not earlier than 1930. Oh, the things I want to know now that I wish I asked my mother! I was stumped by the need for four nipples but no bottles.

  5. Pingback: It’s All About Gratitude! | Mind and Life Matters

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