Ah, aw, awe” moments

speaker I belong to Toastmasters International.  One of the first things new members find they need to overcome is their “ah” crutches.  It is likely that a speaker will fill pauses with some kind of “ah” or “uh” while forming new thoughts or deciding just what to say  My water-loo is saying too many “you knows.”  At least now I seldom use “ah” unless I am really meaning to.  Such as in the following:

A pickup swerves into our lane, I yell a scary, “Ah.”
Texas makes a TD against OU. I yell, “Awww,” in disgust.
OU makes a TD against Texas. “Aaaaahhhh!” in delight.
Then there are Aw’s of sympathy. Like Aw when Kristina stubbed her toe on the chair leg. And Aw’s of pain. Like when I stub my toe on a chair leg.
“Ah” when I figure out how to retrieve a document from the computer.
“Aw” when I can’t go to a party because of a prior commitment.
“Aw” when the electricity goes off and my article is only half typed.
“Ah” when I get the point of a funny joke.
“Aw” when my son calls and says he has a flat on the highway, to come and get him, and then he laughs and you know he was just pulling your leg.
“Ah, ah, ah,” when reprimanding and pointing a finger at a naughty child.

Then there are “Aw” moments that are “Awe” moments:
Thinking how big numbers can get if you keep adding zeros.
Seeing the River Dancers for the first time.
Looking at tiny toes of a sleeping baby.
Watching nine puppies snuggling mom for milk.
Listening to Taps after the soldier’s sacrifice.
Feeling the beat of my heart doing its job all these years.
Sitting at the feet of Jesus. meditating on his love.
Singing in the Rockies, “I bow at thy shrine, my Savior divine, my wonderful, wonderful Lord.”
Ah, Lord God, how awesome are so many Big-Little “awe” things.

About oneta hayes

ABOUT ME Hello. To various folks I am Neat’nee, Mom, Grandma Neta, Gramma, Aunt Neta, Aunt Noni, Aunt Neno, and Aunt Neto (lots of varieties from little nieces and nephews). To some I’m more like “Didn’t you used to be my teacher?” or “Don’t I know you from someplace?” To you, perhaps, I am a Fellow Blogger. Not “fellow” like a male or a guy, but “fellow” like a companion or an adventurer. I would choose to be Grandma Blogger, and have you pull up a chair, my website before you, while I tell you of some days of yore. I have experienced life much differently than most of you. It was and is a good life. I hope to share nuggets of appreciation for those who have gone before me and those who come after me. By necessity you are among those who come after me and I will tell you of those who came before. Once upon a time in a little house on a prairie - oops, change that lest I commit plagiarism - and change that “house on the prairie” to “dugout on the prairie.” So my story begins...
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12 Responses to Ah, aw, awe” moments

  1. This is beautiful. One of my favorite posts of yours.

  2. Dawn Marie says:

    Clever and insightful – I am completely AWEstruck! Hugs😘

  3. Yinglan says:

    That is great that you got over your ums and ahs. After stepping away from Toastmasters for 5 years, I have to train myself to overcome these things again.

  4. Roos Ruse says:

    Great, Oneta, now I’m off on a new list of Aw, Ah and Awes. Excellent read, my dear friend!

  5. Faye says:

    Great read Oneta. Something to remember when we speak. When we write its the unnecessary that’s and like’s and particularly the repetitive this sounds or looks…followed by a lengthy discussion on something ‘similar’ which often distracts. Thank you for interesting thoughts to take a note about.

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